Tuesday, 22 May 2012

Please do not remove from lock

Yesterday's earlier than expected start had left us with some time to kill. I'd have been happy to take things easy but Mark, of course, had come for some boating so where better to go than Droitwich again.The volunteer locky was absent today and at the first lock on the Junction Canal Mark came across this peice of wood on the balance beam
Of course, when he opened the gate it promptly fell (or was it pushed?) into the cut and disappeared. We had a good look for it as did the crew of an uphill boat but it was nowhere to be seen. Currents are funny things however and after we'd gone down the next lock I spotted it floating on the surface and was able to reverse and retrieve it using the green  metal rod (on the right) that has no purpose but which I keep on the roof "just in case". I can't imagine what it's for - does anyone know? (There was a identical one on the other beam).
I was glad of another opportunity to visit Droitwich as it gave me the chance to take some photos of Norbury House - a former hotel from Droitwich's brief attempt to brand itself a Spa in the 1930s, now converted into apartments and sitting rather incongruously in the main street.



Norbury House


Then it was back up to Hanbury Wharf. The top three locks are fitted with side ponds. Number two's were locked out of use but three and one were workable, although I noted that the volunteer locky hadn't used them when we came through last week, another example of their lack of efficient working unfortunately.


Last night's pub was a bit disappointing having been modernised by a new landlord only two months ago. He was proud of his work but I didn't have the heart to tell him that for me at least he had removed any reason to revisit it. Tonight we'll give the Boat and Railway at Stoke Works a try.

3 comments:

No Direction said...

That bit of wood shows you don't know as much about canals and locks as you think you do.

Anonymous said...

The piece of wood is needed to prop the lock gates shut - or open because they are (unusually) well balanced and move themselves with the slightest porovocation

Jim said...

The gates stayed open - and shut - perfectly well without using them.
So, come on then Ray: what do YOU know?!!